The Science Behind Mature Dog Foods
The Science Behind Mature Dog Foods-mobile

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The Science Behind Mature Dog Foods

As your dog matures, his body functions change. He might have decreased immune-system function, deterioration of skin and coat quality, and more frequent intestinal problems. So it makes sense that what a mature dog eats might also need to change.

 

 

Decreased Immune-System Function

Throughout a dog's life, a process called peroxidation occurs. This is a normal process the body uses to destroy cells that outlive their usefulness and to kill germs and parasites, but this process also can destroy or damage healthy cells. As a dog ages, the damage caused by peroxidation accumulates and, in turn, increases the risk of certain problems such as infections.

Antioxidants are naturally occurring components in the body (but also can be acquired through diet). They help maintain overall health by neutralizing the peroxidation process of cellular molecules.

Research sponsored by IAMS™ found that dogs fed a diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamin E had improved immune responses and vaccine recognition. This might be especially important for mature/senior dogs, because IAMS research has found that, as dogs age, immune responses can decrease.

 

 

Deterioration of Skin and Coat Quality

Eating a complete and balanced diet with omega-3 fatty acids, such as those found in vitamin-rich fish oils, also helps rejuvenate dry skin and develop a healthy, lustrous coat.

 

 

More Frequent Intestinal Problems

Aging dogs might have higher numbers of unfavorable bacteria and lower numbers of beneficial bacteria in their intestines, which can result in clinical signs of gastrointestinal problems (such as diarrhea). A diet with a moderately fermentable fiber source such as beet pulp can help maintain intestinal health. Beet pulp provides energy for the cells lining the intestine and promotes proper stool formation.

 

 

How Do I Know When My Dog Needs a Mature Diet?

Different dogs show signs of aging at different times, and much of this variation is associated with size. Larger dogs generally appear mature/senior sooner than smaller dogs. The table below can show you when your dog should start a mature diet with a food such as IAMS ProActive Health™ Mature Adult.

 

Dog Weight and Transition to Mature/Senior Foods

Weight Range Age to Begin Transition
More than 90 lbs 5 years
51 to 90 lbs 6 years
21 to 50 lbs 7 years
Up to 20 lbs 7 years

  • How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods
    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods-mobile

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    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods

    What Is Beet Pulp?

    Beet pulp is the material that remains after sugar is extracted from sugar beets—not red beets. Beet pulp is a source of fiber in dog diets.

    Fiber and Beet Pulp

    Fiber can be classified as nonfermentable and fermentable. Nonfermentable fiber remains undigested as it passes through the intestines, thereby providing bulk to move wastes out. Cellulose is a nonfermentable fiber.
     

    Fermentable fiber is broken down in the intestines into short-chain fatty acids that provide energy for cells lining the intestine.
     

    Moderately fermentable fiber does both: It provides bulk to move waste and provides energy for cells lining the intestine. Beet pulp is a moderately fermentable fiber.

     

    Myths About Beet Pulp

    "Beet pulp is harmful."
     

    Beet pulp contains no toxins and is a very safe fiber source.
     

    "Beet pulp affects coat color."
     

    There is nothing in beet pulp that can affect coat pigment. The inside is light in color. The outside peel, which is dark, is not used.
     

    "Beet pulp contains sugar."
     

    By definition, beet pulp is the material that remains after the sugar is removed from sugar beets. Therefore, beet pulp contains no sugar.
     

    "Beet pulp causes bloat."
     

    Bloat (gastric dilatation-volvulus or GDV) is related to a stomach defect that delays emptying. It is believed that bloat is not related to diet or ingredients, such as beet pulp. However, the cause of bloat remains unknown.

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