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How to house train a puppy
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How to house train a puppy

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A new puppy is wonderful in pretty much every way, at least until they start having accidents around your apartment or house. But do not fear, Expert Pet Trainer Kathy Santo has all the answers. Watch as she takes you through the basics on everything from establishing a routine to rewarding your puppy when they eliminate outdoors.

 

House training your puppy requires more than a stack of old newspapers. It calls for patience, commitment, and above all, consistency. Hi, I'm Kathy Santo with IAMS, and today we're going to talk about how to house train your puppy. A trusting and consistent relationship is fundamental to successful house trading. The more consistent you are, the faster your puppy will learn. House training a puppy can take several weeks, and sometimes longer with smaller breeds. The first step to house training your puppy is to establish a routine. Puppies do best on a regular schedule, because it teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play, and times to potty. As a general rule, a puppy can control his bladder about an hour for every month of age. So if your puppy is only three months old, he can probably only hold it for about three hours, if not less. Make sure to take him right out after he wakes up, during and after play time, and after eating or drinking, because these are times he'd most likely to have to go. If you work, and are unable to take your puppy outside as often as needed, you could hire a dog walker to give your puppy his necessary breaks. I recommend picking a specific bathroom spot outside, and always taking him there first when he's on a leash. While your puppy is going, say something like, "go potty," so that you can eventually use that phrase to remind him what to do. You should take him out for a walk or play time after he's gone potty, or he might just learn to hold it to keep you outside. Reward your puppy every time he goes potty outdoors with praise or a treat, but make sure to do so immediately, before he goes back into the house. Rewarding correct behavior is the best way to teach your puppy. Be careful not to reward your puppy until he's completely finished, or he may forget to finish up outside, and then have an accident inside. And remember, what goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. So always take your puppy out after feeding. Try picking up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime, so he won't have as much water to try and hold overnight. If you keep a consistent schedule, your puppy could be house trained by the time he's five to six months old. But don't be discouraged if it takes your puppy longer, or has an occasional accident. Many factors, including breed of dog, consistency, and temperament can contribute to a longer training period. If you feel that there's little to no progress, consult with your veterinarian to be sure that a medical issue, such as a bladder infection, isn't the culprit. Supervision in the beginning is critical. Exercise pens are extremely helpful while house training. Keeping your puppy in a small space within eyesight will allow you to notice and react when they start showing the signs of needing to eliminate. Those signs can be barking, scratching at the door, squatting, sniffing, or circling. If you're unable to monitor your puppy, you can confine him to an area small enough so that he won't want to eliminate there. A space just large enough for him to lay down with a couple extra inches is just fine. Many people choose to combine with a crate, which can be very helpful for house training your young dog. For more information on crate training, watch "How To Crate Train Your Puppy." I'm Kathy Santo with IAMS, and I hope that you found this helpful as you welcome your new addition to your family.

  • 4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet
    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet-mob

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    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet

    Switching your dog to a new food takes some planning. Because dogs are creatures of habit, they tend to prefer their current food to a new food. Like us, they become accustomed to a food and might not be thrilled about a new routine. These useful dog-feeding tips will help you keep your dog satisfied.

     

     

    4 Tips to Successfully Transition Your Dog to a New Food

    1. Introduce the new food gradually.

    When easing your dog into a change in diet, think “slow and steady.” Start by mixing 25% new food with 75% current food. Slowly change the proportions over the next three days or so by gradually increasing the new food and lessening the amount of the current food. Here’s a sample feeding schedule:

    • Day 1: 25% new food, 75% current food
    • Day 2: 50% new food, 50% current food
    • Day 3: 75% new food, 25% current food

     

    At the end of this weaning process, you should be feeding 100% of the new food. Your dog may want to eat only the old food, or not eat at all. Don’t worry — a healthy dog can miss meals for a day or two with no ill effects.

     

     

    2. Watch your body language.

    Bringing a new food into your home, pouring it into your dog’s bowl and declaring that he should eat it might cause your dog to go on a hunger strike. This is not the time to show who’s boss. It’s better to introduce the new food by using a pleasant tone of voice and gently encouraging him to try the new food.

     

     

    3. Don't give in to demands.

    Persistence is key! For the first two days of the food transition, don’t give your dog treats or table scraps. Dogs train us as much as we train them. Giving in to their demands only reinforces refusal behavior and makes it more difficult to make a nutritious dietary change.

     

     

    4. Be patient when switching from wet food to dry food.

    Switching diets may be more challenging when changing from a moist food to a dry food. If your dog continues to resist eating dry food, mix in a little warm water. You might even want to put the moistened food in the microwave for a few seconds. If you mix the food with water, be sure to throw away the uneaten portion after 20 minutes to prevent spoilage. The same rule applies for canned and pouch food. After the dog has become accustomed to the moistened food, you can wean him onto completely dry food. To do this, follow the same mixing instructions outlined above.

    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet
    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet
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