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Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

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Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

Big dogs equal big love

Whether your dog is a big sweetie, a big weirdo or a big athlete, here’s what you need to know about taking care of your big dog.
 

First, all big dogs start out as little dogs. But pretty soon they grow up — and so does their appetite, their toys, their dog bowls, the vet bill and their need for speed.
 

He started to grow.
And pretty soon
he was bigger than
the recliner.

 

Large dogs grow more slowly than smaller ones

Sometimes it can take more than two years for them to reach their full size.
 

And you won’t like to think about it too much, but their life spans are shorter, too: about 10 to 12 years.
 

No wonder
you'll let him push
you off the bed
at night.

 

So remember: Everything in moderation.

If a large dog gets too much food as a pup, they’re at a higher risk of growing too quickly, which can cause joint trouble.
 

For large breeds, being overweight is especially problematic. All that extra weight can be a lot for the joints to carry around.
 

Keep your good old dog healthy by practicing portion control and feeding nutritious food like IAMS™ Mature Adult Large Breed.
 

How will she catch
a screaming
15-mile-an-hour
Frisbee in midair
if she has knee trouble.

 

A word about exercising with a large dog.

Back in the day, large-breed dogs were especially energetic. They were working dogs, herders, hunters, cart pullers and people protectors.

 

Who are we to deny their evolution?

Make sure your dog gets exercise every day.
 

How do you accomplish this? Walk, walk and more walk. And add in some running, jumping, chasing, hiking, fetching, dog-park visiting, swimming and even agility courses.
 

Repeat this mantra:
"I am the alpha."

 

When it comes to training, think of it this way: The bigger the dog, the harder it is to hide behavior problems. And if you can’t control your super-sized soulmate, they could inadvertently cause damage or hurt someone.

  • Make time for training from day one.
  • Teach easy commands early.
  • Use a firm and confident voice.
  • Keep your dog exercised to fend off boredom-induced behaviors.
  • Reward good behaviors.

 

Living large is all
about biting the
wind and living
that sweet,
sweet life.

Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

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    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet

    Switching your dog to a new food takes some planning. Because dogs are creatures of habit, they tend to prefer their current food to a new food. Like us, they become accustomed to a food and might not be thrilled about a new routine. These useful dog-feeding tips will help you keep your dog satisfied.

     

     

    4 Tips to Successfully Transition Your Dog to a New Food

    1. Introduce the new food gradually.

    When easing your dog into a change in diet, think “slow and steady.” Start by mixing 25% new food with 75% current food. Slowly change the proportions over the next three days or so by gradually increasing the new food and lessening the amount of the current food. Here’s a sample feeding schedule:

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    At the end of this weaning process, you should be feeding 100% of the new food. Your dog may want to eat only the old food, or not eat at all. Don’t worry — a healthy dog can miss meals for a day or two with no ill effects.

     

     

    2. Watch your body language.

    Bringing a new food into your home, pouring it into your dog’s bowl and declaring that he should eat it might cause your dog to go on a hunger strike. This is not the time to show who’s boss. It’s better to introduce the new food by using a pleasant tone of voice and gently encouraging him to try the new food.

     

     

    3. Don't give in to demands.

    Persistence is key! For the first two days of the food transition, don’t give your dog treats or table scraps. Dogs train us as much as we train them. Giving in to their demands only reinforces refusal behavior and makes it more difficult to make a nutritious dietary change.

     

     

    4. Be patient when switching from wet food to dry food.

    Switching diets may be more challenging when changing from a moist food to a dry food. If your dog continues to resist eating dry food, mix in a little warm water. You might even want to put the moistened food in the microwave for a few seconds. If you mix the food with water, be sure to throw away the uneaten portion after 20 minutes to prevent spoilage. The same rule applies for canned and pouch food. After the dog has become accustomed to the moistened food, you can wean him onto completely dry food. To do this, follow the same mixing instructions outlined above.

    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet
    4 Tips for Changing Your Dog’s Diet
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