How to Decipher Dog-Food Labels: Calorie and Fat Terms
How to Decipher Dog-Food Labels: Calorie and Fat Terms-mob

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How to Decipher Dog-Food Labels: Calorie and Fat Terms

What Is the Difference Between Light and Reduced-Calorie Dog Foods?

Dog-food products described as light, lite, or low calorie must meet specific calorie levels set by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), while dog foods named “less” or “reduced calorie” must show a percent reduction in calories as compared to a product in the same moisture-content category. The following table shows the guidelines as set by AAFCO for both dog and cat foods for determining whether a product can use the term “light.”
 

Food Texture Moisture Content Dog Foods Maximum kcal ME/kg Cat Foods Maximum kcalME/kg
Dry less than 20% moisture 3,100 3,250
Semi-Moist between 20 and 64% moisture 2,500 2,650
Canned 65% or more moisture 900 950

 

 

What Is the Difference Between Lean and Reduced-Fat Dog Foods?

Like light versus reduced-calorie foods, lean or low-fat dog-food products must meet specific fat levels set by AAFCO, and less-fat or reduced-fat dog-food products need to show a percent reduction in fat as compared to a product in the same moisture category. AAFCO guidelines for dog and cat foods with “lean,” “low fat,” or similar words are shown in the following table.
 

Food Texture Moisture Content Dog Foods Maximum % Crude Fat Cat Foods Maximum % Crude Fat
Dry less than 20% moisture 9 10
Semi-Moist between 20 and 64% moisture 7 8
Canned 65% or more moisture 4 5

  • How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods
    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods-mobile

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    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods

    What Is Beet Pulp?

    Beet pulp is the material that remains after sugar is extracted from sugar beets—not red beets. Beet pulp is a source of fiber in dog diets.

    Fiber and Beet Pulp

    Fiber can be classified as nonfermentable and fermentable. Nonfermentable fiber remains undigested as it passes through the intestines, thereby providing bulk to move wastes out. Cellulose is a nonfermentable fiber.
     

    Fermentable fiber is broken down in the intestines into short-chain fatty acids that provide energy for cells lining the intestine.
     

    Moderately fermentable fiber does both: It provides bulk to move waste and provides energy for cells lining the intestine. Beet pulp is a moderately fermentable fiber.

     

    Myths About Beet Pulp

    "Beet pulp is harmful."
     

    Beet pulp contains no toxins and is a very safe fiber source.
     

    "Beet pulp affects coat color."
     

    There is nothing in beet pulp that can affect coat pigment. The inside is light in color. The outside peel, which is dark, is not used.
     

    "Beet pulp contains sugar."
     

    By definition, beet pulp is the material that remains after the sugar is removed from sugar beets. Therefore, beet pulp contains no sugar.
     

    "Beet pulp causes bloat."
     

    Bloat (gastric dilatation-volvulus or GDV) is related to a stomach defect that delays emptying. It is believed that bloat is not related to diet or ingredients, such as beet pulp. However, the cause of bloat remains unknown.

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