Does Your Dog Have Allergies?
Does Your Dog Have Allergies?-mob

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Does Your Dog Have Allergies?

The human animal isn’t the only one affected by allergies. Like you, your adult dog can suffer from allergic reactions to any number of things—in the air, on his skin, and in his food. Allergies must be diagnosed and treated by your veterinarian, but first, you must know what to look for.
 

The most common signs and symptoms of allergies include:

  • Persistent scratching, licking, and skin chewing
  • Face and ear rubbing
  • Inflamed skin patches, hair loss, and foul odor
  • Coughing, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose
  • Frequent vomiting or diarrhea

 

The most common allergy symptoms in dogs are the skin reactions, regardless of the cause. And they can they can crop up at any age. Just because he didn’t have allergies as a puppy, doesn’t mean your dog won’t have them now that he’s an adult. Inhalant, food, contact, and flea allergies are four of the most common types of allergies that might affect your dog.
 

Inhalant allergies in dogs are caused by the same common allergens that affect you—dust, grass, trees, mold, pollen, ragweed, etc. They can be seasonal or persistent and, while some breeds (especially short-snouted breeds) might experience the same sniffly, sneezy symptoms you might suffer, skin reactions are most common. Inhalant allergies often can be treated with the same medications you take, but please don’t treat your dog’s allergies without veterinary supervision.
 

Food allergies can be the most difficult to diagnose and manage. Treatment involves a hit-and-miss approach involving a restricted diet and the gradual reintroduction of possible allergens to determine the culprit. Skin reactions to food allergies are common in dogs, but frequent vomiting or diarrhea also can be a sign. Keep in mind that if there is a change in your dog’s diet (or he just ate something he wasn’t supposed to), he might experience an episode of vomiting or diarrhea, but this doesn’t necessarily mean your dog has an allergy. Watch and see if it becomes a persistent problem before scheduling a costly trip to the vet.
 

Contact and flea allergies generally cause skin irritation and are treated topically. You might be surprised to learn that most dogs are only vaguely bothered by fleas. But those that are allergic can suffer—and so can their owners. Dogs with contact and flea allergies often chew their skin raw, leading to hair loss, odor, and infection, so fastidious flea control is a must.
 

Allergies can vary from dog to dog, so it is important that you work with your vet to make sure your dog gets the best possible treatment. You’ll both be happier for it.

Does Your Dog Have Allergies?
  • How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods
    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods-mobile

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    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods

    What Is Beet Pulp?

    Beet pulp is the material that remains after sugar is extracted from sugar beets—not red beets. Beet pulp is a source of fiber in dog diets.

    Fiber and Beet Pulp

    Fiber can be classified as nonfermentable and fermentable. Nonfermentable fiber remains undigested as it passes through the intestines, thereby providing bulk to move wastes out. Cellulose is a nonfermentable fiber.
     

    Fermentable fiber is broken down in the intestines into short-chain fatty acids that provide energy for cells lining the intestine.
     

    Moderately fermentable fiber does both: It provides bulk to move waste and provides energy for cells lining the intestine. Beet pulp is a moderately fermentable fiber.

     

    Myths About Beet Pulp

    "Beet pulp is harmful."
     

    Beet pulp contains no toxins and is a very safe fiber source.
     

    "Beet pulp affects coat color."
     

    There is nothing in beet pulp that can affect coat pigment. The inside is light in color. The outside peel, which is dark, is not used.
     

    "Beet pulp contains sugar."
     

    By definition, beet pulp is the material that remains after the sugar is removed from sugar beets. Therefore, beet pulp contains no sugar.
     

    "Beet pulp causes bloat."
     

    Bloat (gastric dilatation-volvulus or GDV) is related to a stomach defect that delays emptying. It is believed that bloat is not related to diet or ingredients, such as beet pulp. However, the cause of bloat remains unknown.

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