How to Transition Your Puppy to Adult Food
How to Transition Your Puppy to Adult Food mobile

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How to Transition Your Puppy to Adult Food

Your puppy’s nutritional needs will change as he grows into adulthood, but how do you know when your puppy is ready for adult food?
 

Depending on his breed size, at some point between 12 and 24 months of age, you should reexamine your puppy's nutritional needs and choose the right adult formula. His adult food could depend upon his metabolism (Does he gain weight easily?) and his activity level (Is it low, normal, or high?) These factors can help you find the ideal food for your dog.
 

The transition to a premium adult formula should begin when your dog approaches adult height and weight. The kind of dog you have will determine the right time to switch. When you do switch to adult formula, follow the same four-day process as you did when introducing your puppy to premium puppy food.
 

Small-breed dogs tend to mature physically much sooner than large-breed dogs. Follow these guidelines to help you decide when to switch formulas:
 

  • Small-breed dogs (20 pounds or less when fully grown) are usually ready to transition to an adult formula when they are 9 to 12 months of age.
  • Medium-breed dogs (between 20 and 50 pounds when fully grown) normally mature at around 12 to 14 months of age.
  • Large-breed dogs (more than 50 pounds when fully grown) might not be ready to switch to an adult food until they are between 12 and 24 months old.

 

 

Why Switch to an Adult Formula?

As your new puppy quickly matures into adulthood, he needs nutrition appropriate for his "new" body. That means a high-quality, premium adult formula. Most veterinarians agree that feeding a complete and balanced premium food, such as IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Adult MiniChunks, throughout your dog's adulthood can promote a long and healthy life.

  • How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods
    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods-mobile

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    How Beet Pulp Ingredients Are Used in Our Dog Foods

    What Is Beet Pulp?

    Beet pulp is the material that remains after sugar is extracted from sugar beets—not red beets. Beet pulp is a source of fiber in dog diets.

    Fiber and Beet Pulp

    Fiber can be classified as nonfermentable and fermentable. Nonfermentable fiber remains undigested as it passes through the intestines, thereby providing bulk to move wastes out. Cellulose is a nonfermentable fiber.
     

    Fermentable fiber is broken down in the intestines into short-chain fatty acids that provide energy for cells lining the intestine.
     

    Moderately fermentable fiber does both: It provides bulk to move waste and provides energy for cells lining the intestine. Beet pulp is a moderately fermentable fiber.

     

    Myths About Beet Pulp

    "Beet pulp is harmful."
     

    Beet pulp contains no toxins and is a very safe fiber source.
     

    "Beet pulp affects coat color."
     

    There is nothing in beet pulp that can affect coat pigment. The inside is light in color. The outside peel, which is dark, is not used.
     

    "Beet pulp contains sugar."
     

    By definition, beet pulp is the material that remains after the sugar is removed from sugar beets. Therefore, beet pulp contains no sugar.
     

    "Beet pulp causes bloat."
     

    Bloat (gastric dilatation-volvulus or GDV) is related to a stomach defect that delays emptying. It is believed that bloat is not related to diet or ingredients, such as beet pulp. However, the cause of bloat remains unknown.

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